FY 2024 USGS 104B Request for Proposals

On February 12, 2024, KWRRI released the FY 2024 Request for Proposals for the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) 104b grant program. This program is targeted toward supporting water-related research efforts conducted by students at universities and colleges in Kentucky. Research priorities include Water Scarcity and Availability; Water Hazards and Climate Variability; Water Quality; Water Policy, Planning, and Socioeconomics; Watershed and Ecosystem Function; Water Technology and Innovation; and Workforce Development and Water Literacy. 

Of note are several changes from prior years:

  1. The matching requirement has been reduced from 2:1 to 1:1.

  2. We will be evaluating proposals in two categories: larger research grants ($10,000 to $20,000) and student research seed grants ($5,000 to $10,000).

  3. Renewal of projects for a second year.

  4. The proposal length, format, and reporting has been adjusted.

The deadline to apply is March 22, 2024, at 5:00 p.m. Application materials are linked below. You are required to use the templates provided. Proposal submissions should be submitted to the Institute by email (kwrri@uky.edu).

If you have questions or need additional guidance, we can be reached by email (kwri@uky.edu).

FY 2023 USGS 104G Request for Proposals

The fiscal year 2023 Water Resources Research Act Program request for applications has been released.  It includes three nationally competitive grant programs:

  1. National Competitive Grants (104g) - $1,860,000 funding available, maximum award $310,000

FY2023 Announcement

Ongoing research needs include improving and enhancing the nation’s water supply and availability, as well as promoting the exploration of new ideas that address or expand our understanding of water problems. Proposals are sought on the following specific areas of inquiry; levels of priority are not assigned, and the order of listing does not indicate the level of priority:

National-scale evaluation of water budget: Retrospective or predictive analyses using hydroclimate-forcing data sets, with emphasis on CONUS404, which was developed in a USGS- NCAR collaboration. Additional guidance includes

  • Emphasis on prediction of water-budget components through a variety of interpretive approaches
  • Incorporation of how uncertainty in hydroclimate-forcing propagates to water budget components
  • Consideration of both retrospective and projected conditions.

Rasmussen, R.M., Liu, C., Ikeda, K., Chen, F., Kim, J., Schneider, T., Gochis, D., Dugger, A., and Viger, R., 2023, Four-kilometer long-term regional hydroclimate reanalysis over the conterminous United States (CONUS), 1979-2020: U.S. Geological Survey data release.

Socioeconomics: Integrate ongoing USGS research and data collection in order to assess socioeconomic and ecological vulnerability to compounding extreme events and develop adaptation measures. This proposed project should undertake new research (e.g., Water Use and Social and Economic Drivers Program) to understand the vulnerability of urban (e.g., trans-basin diversions), agricultural (e.g., reservoir management), and ecological (e.g., endangered species) water-use sectors to drought and compounding hazards such as wildfire. Additional guidance includes:

  • Provide a quantifiable portfolio of risk for water-use sectors (including ecological and socio-economic).
  • Develop climate futures and planning scenarios for relevant institutions: management, communities, other institutions.
  1. Aquatic Invasive Species Competitive Grants - $1,395,000 funding available, maximum award $279,000

FY2023 Announcement

The challenges and opportunities that link aquatic invasive species and water resources are poorly understood, despite the real and growing effect of numerous aquatic invasive species on water quality, water quantity, and aquatic ecosystems. Research is needed to better identify and understand these interactions and to guide management decisions that will help to improve invasive species management and thus reduce effects of invasive species on water resources and aquatic ecosystems at local, regional, and national scales. Proposals are sought on the following specific areas of inquiry (levels of priority are not assigned, and the order of listing does not indicate the level of priority):

  • Effects: Research that improves our understanding of the effects of aquatic invasive species on lakes, rivers, and associated tributaries in the upper Mississippi River basin, including changes to water quantity, water quality, and ecosystem dynamics.
  • Characteristics: Research that identifies physical, biological, and chemical characteristics of water bodies that infer resistance and resilience to the distribution, establishment, and effects of aquatic invasive species in the upper Mississippi River basin. Research is needed to better understand these interactions to guide management decisions that will improve invasive species management and result in positive effects on aquatic ecosystems.
  • Management: Research on assessment of the detection, spread, and management of aquatic invasive species in the upper Mississippi River basin and the connections to human dimensions, both socially and economically. Note that this does not include physical control of AIS.
  1. Per-and polyflouroalkyl Substances (PFAS) Competitive Grants - $2,790,000 funding available, maximum award $279,000

FY2023 Announcement

The challenges and opportunities of understanding the effects of per-and polyfluoroalkyl (PFAS) substances on water resources are poorly understood, despite the real and growing effect of this group of man-made substances on water quality and the resultant exposure to humans, other organisms, and ecosystems. Research is needed to better understand these interactions and guide management decisions that will improve water resources at the regional or national scale.
Proposals are sought on the following specific areas of inquiry (levels of priority are not assigned, and the order of listing does not indicate the level of priority): Media-specific methods: Enhanced methods for detection on specific media, with a clear indication of

  • new or different compounds,
  • new or different methodological approaches,
  • lower detection levels for specific media or compounds, especially with respect to EPA health guidelines for PFOA (Perfluorooctanoic Acid) and PFOS (Perfluorooctane Sulfonate). Media of interest include (in ranked order) (1) Tissues/plasma, (2) sediment, (3) air or interfaces, (4) water. Atmospheric sources: Improved understanding of atmospheric exchange in PFAS distribution and fate. This may include methods to determine transport of PFAS to the atmosphere and to subsequent receiving waters, such as a water method that determines "new" compounds based on their likelihood to occur in the atmosphere.

Atmospheric sources: Improved understanding of atmospheric exchange in PFAS distribution and fate. This may include methods to determine transport of PFAS to the atmosphere and to subsequent receiving waters, such as a water method that determines "new" compounds based on their likelihood to occur in the atmosphere.

Processes oriented at molecular level: Process-oriented research of PFAS fate, transport, and effects, with emphasis on molecular-level understanding of PFAS precursor transformation, sorption dynamics, or mechanisms of bioaccumulation and(or) biological/ecological effects.

For all three requests for proposals, an objective is to promote collaboration between the USGS and university scientists in research on significant national and regional water-resources issues. Proposals exhibiting substantial collaboration between the USGS and the applicant are strongly encouraged. Collaborative proposals should describe in detail the respective roles of the USGS and the applicant in the proposed work. It is anticipated that in FY2022 the USGS will have internal funds available for modest support of USGS scientists on selected proposals.

Water Resources Research Act Program grants are administered in cooperation between the US Geological Survey and the Water Resources Research Institutes and Centers.  The Kentucky Water Resources Research Institute (KWRRI) coordinates applications from universities or colleges in Kentucky. Applications must be submitted to KWRRI by April 13, 5:00 pm EST, to allow time for the KWRRI to prepare and submit the application package. 

Please contact kwrri@uky.edu ASAP if you are considering submission of a proposal or if you have any questions regarding these announcements. 

For more information on the Water Resources Research Act Program and the grant programs, click here