The Neuroscience Research Priority Area (NRPA) supports a "collaborative matrix," bringing together diverse groups of investigators, trainees, and research groups from more than 8 University of Kentucky colleges. The NRPA builds upon and leverages existing strengths and relationships; providing infrastructure and support to promote research collaborations and raise internal and external recognition of the depth of neuroscience-related research at the university with the goals of growing extramural support, increasing academic productivity, enhancing recruitment of faculty and trainees, and providing new knowledge to address the needs of the citizens of the Commonwealth and beyond.

 

Neuroscience at UK

Neuroscience Research Priority Area

UK Neuroscience Research Priority Area Brings Diverse Groups Together to Advance Studies

Each of these researcher’s ongoing projects and personal experiences exemplify exactly what the NRPA was established for — to build upon and leverage existing strengths and relationships — while providing infrastructure and support to promote research collaborations and raise internal and external recognition of the depth of neuroscience-related research at UK. 

CDC Stroke Grant

UK Healthcare, Partners Receive Prestigious CDC Grant to Improve Stroke Care, Outcomes in Kentucky

UK HealthCareUofL Health, the Kentucky Department for Public Health’s Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention Program (KHDSP), and other state partners have been awarded the prestigious Paul Coverdell National Acute Stroke Program Grant by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. This $1.8 million grant aims to optimize both stroke prevention among those at high risk as well as improve the care and outcomes for stroke patients throughout Kentucky.

Greg Gerhardt Alzheimer's Research NIA grant

New Research May Offer Hope for Alzheimer's Patients

Thanks to a five-year, $2 million grant from the National Institute on Aging, Gerhardt is launching a study to explore the balance of GABA and glutamate in the aging brain. The program will provide answers to long-standing questions that could help to develop new treatments for Alzheimer’s.

Maj-Linda Selenica and Daniel C. Lee Sanders Brown Center on Aging

UK's Sanders-Brown Researchers Discover Polyamines Prevent Collection of Alzheimer's Disease Protein

The study led by Daniel Lee, Ph.D., associate professor, UK Department of Neuroscience, and Maj-Linda Selenica, Ph.D., assistant professor, UK Department of Molecular & Cellular Biochemistry, found that polyamines prevent the clustering of a protein known as tau, which is a hallmark in Alzheimer’s disease.

 

Neuroscience News

See news on Neuroscience-based research at UK. 

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