Photo of Kentucky Tobacco Research and Development Center research coordinator Patrick Perry holds an Artemisia annua seedling at Spindletop Farm.
  • Video
  • Aug 11 2020

Artemisia annua or "Sweet Annie" has been used as a medicinal herb for centuries. With potential to treat a variety of cancers & even COVID-19, this plant is more relevant than ever & UK is showing how we can take it from Kentucky fields to the lab to our patients.

Recent News

Series Spotlight People Behind Our Research

Why do we want you to meet our researchers?

The scientists and scholars at the University of Kentucky are remarkable people. Some of them have a very personal connection to field they have chosen: a family member battling addiction or disease. Some of them began their journey based on curiosity. A drive to find out why the world works the way it does.

What they all have in common is a passion to ignite progress and partner across fields and with communities to confront, head on, the most profound challenges. Research can do that, and our researchers tell you why and how.

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Podcasts

  • Podcast
  • Apr 07 2020

The COVID-19 Unified Research Experts (CURE) Alliance team, a new workgroup within UK’s College of Medicine, is bringing together UK experts from across the campus to focus on advising COVID-19 patient care and clinical trials based on emerging research and potential treatment options.

Videos

    • Aug 11 2020

    Artemisia annua or "Sweet Annie" has been used as a medicinal herb for centuries. With potential to treat a variety of cancers & even COVID-19, this plant is more relevant than ever & UK is showing how we can take it from Kentucky fields to the lab to our patients.

    • Jun 18 2020

    UK College of Medicine researchers are using the special antibodies made by alpacas, called nanobodies, to help understand the novel coronavirus and potentially develop a treatment that could protect people from being infected. 

    • Jun 9 2020

    “The virus is about 120 nanometers in size — in the world of membranes, that's large. Even more so, it's not going to come as a virus by itself, flying in the air. It's going to come in the saliva, so it's going to be a much larger particle. A large particle is just not going through (this filter).”

    • Apr 14 2020

    "The country is running out of personal protection equipment, which is important to prevent not just my friends from getting sick, but my wife, too. She works as a physician," Winkler said. "We must protect those who are risking their lives to protect others from this disease."